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Bible Study – Book of Acts

You are invited to a Bible Study on the Book of Acts starting January 28, morning class is at 10:30 a.m. and an evening class at 6:30 p.m. Bring your bibles, we will be starting on chapter 8. Mary Ruth McRae and Grace Shutt are excited to bring you this study. Let us have eyes to see and ears to hear what our Lord has in store for each of us.  

Morning class – Banquet Room, Evening class – Library.

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The Book of Acts Bible Study

You’re invited (men and women) to a Bible Study on October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and November 5 at 10:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m., your choice; the study will be held in the banquet room (morning session) and in the conference room (evening session).

We will be studying the first seven chapters in the book of Acts. Mary Ruth McRae and I are so excited to bring this study to you. As part of this study, we will see our resurrected Jesus with His disciples giving them their last instructions, study the birth and growth of the early church and learn who was named to replace Judas. We will also be studying the Holy Spirit coming at Pentecost.

We hope to see you in October, you only need to bring your bible. If you have questions just give me a call – Grace Shutt – 336-408-4969

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Resolution 14:

As we strive to live like Jesus, love like Jesus, and serve like Jesus, the Joint Board of New Philadelphia Moravian continues to uphold our mission statement: New Philadelphia seeks to be a caring congregation, worshiping God, and encouraging one another to seek a closer relationship with Jesus Christ, as we follow the lead of the Holy Spirit in Service and in Mission.

Resolution 14 of the 2018 Southern Province Synod has been the subject of much discussion in the recent months. Resolution 14 allows (not requires) for a same gender wedding to be performed in Moravian churches or officiated by Moravian pastors. It also allows for the PEC to ordain homosexual pastors who are either married or celibate.

There is some debate about Resolution 14, as approved by the 2018 Synod, being non-compliant with the Church Order of the Unitas Fratrum (the governing document of the worldwide Moravian Church). As things stand right now, the action of the Synod is valid. As a member of the Moravian Church Southern Province, our congregation falls under the authority of the Provincial Synod.

The Joint Board has discussed Resolution 14 and has agreed that it is the responsibility of the Board of Elders to determine who is married in our church (or by our pastors), who is received into the membership of the congregation, and who can participate in the rites and sacraments of the church. We will prayerfully consider each request for membership or admission to the rites and sacraments (including marriage ceremonies) as they are made by the individuals who make them. The Board of Elders is also responsible for determining the purposes for which our church buildings and properties may be used. This responsibility was affirmed by Synod.

The calling of a new pastor is a function of the Joint Board working with the Provincial Elders’ Conference. As part of this process, the members of the Joint Board will have the opportunity to share their opinions about calling a pastor who is a homosexual.

People can and do disagree about the scriptural interpretation and understanding of homosexuality; disagreement doesn’t have to cause division- division only happens when we feel that what we disagree about is more important than what we agree about. We agree about the essentials; we strive to have unity in the essentials, liberty in the non-essentials, and love in all things.

As a Joint Board we would like to communicate what we are focused on going forward, and what binds us together. Please prayerfully consider the following words, and help us all focus on the things we do agree about and our continued work in Christ’s name.

Unity:

 In Paul’s letter to the Romans he says ‘May the God who gives you endurance and encouragement give you a spirit of unity among yourselves as you follow Christ Jesus, so that with one heart and mouth you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ’.

Our uniting principal as a congregation is the desire to glorify the Father and the Son. Home is New Philadelphia Moravian Church. We the congregation are New Philadelphia Moravian Church.

When we come for Sunday worship we know we are home; when we greet each other with the welcoming grace of Christ we know we are home; when we share tears of sadness and joy together we know we are home; and when we glorify God together through our missions and community outreach we know we are home. Through trials and tribulations, joy and grief, loss and celebration of new life, remembrances of generations that came before us, and the hope and anticipation of the generations to come, we all know in our hearts that this is home.

 

Going Forward:

We have a unique opportunity to chart our own course for decades to come. The Joint Board is very excited about opportunities we have as a congregation and church to shine in the eyes of God and build on the great legacy and tradition of New Philadelphia Moravian Church.

This is our focus going forward, and we ask you to join with us in these endeavors:

  • Source, consider, and hire an outstanding Intentional Interim Pastor who is trained in helping congregations like ours transition from one great Senior Pastor to another. No one will ever fill the shoes of Worth Green. But we have an opportunity to take time to understand who we are as a congregation, where we would like to go in the future, and have a trained professional guide us through a process so WE can define the type of Senior Pastor that will take this Church and our faith ‘onward and upward’ for decades to come.
  • The Joint Board is focused on building ‘Generation Next’ at New Philadelphia Moravian. While continuing to care for the current congregation, we know our viability as a church and ability to continue glorifying God rests solely on our ability to bring the next generation of Moravians to New Philadelphia. Those who have gone before us worked hard to allow our families to worship at New Philadelphia, and it’s time for us to do the same for the next generation.
  • One of the consistent hallmarks of healthy and sustaining churches is a vibrant and growing Youth Program. The Joint Board considers our investment of time, money, and talents in growing our Youth Program to be a top priority. You will see more specifics about this in coming months.

In Closing:

In Essentials Unity, In Non-Essentials Liberty, and in all things Love

Read that to yourself multiple times. We have a motto that should appeal to all walks of life, young and old, believers and those who are seeking their faith, and most importantly it fosters a unique atmosphere of faith and family that cannot be replicated anywhere else in the world. It’s time to move forward as a united congregation and focus on growing this church, glorifying God the Father, and continuing to build an atmosphere of faith and family that will be the gold standard of the Moravian Church for decades to come. We need you, and most importantly we all need each other.

‘I in them and you in me. May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me’   – John 17:23

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People have a right to know how their pastor will respond to the recent move of the 2018 Synod of the Southern Province of the Moravian Church to permit individual congregations to decide whether or not they will perform same sex marriages. I have written a paper to describe where I think I must be at this moment in our local church, province and denomination. It is available HERE in PDF form for the convenience of our congregation and other interested parties. As always, I have tried to accent the Unity of our church, province and denomination over any one position, including my own. I respect those brothers and sisters who disagree with me, regardless of what you believe. May God bless all of us, and grant all of us guidance, grace and peace, whoever we are, and whatever we believe on this subject.

Worth Green
Senior Pastor

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Becoming New

2 Corinthians 5:6-10, 14-17

June 17, 2018

 

Today is Father’s Day and I am wearing my dad’s tie. My dad died from cancer just after I accepted the call here to New Philadelphia. He was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung cancer in early September 2016 and not even two months later, he died. I remember the day before his funeral. Kelly and I were out looking for some appropriate clothes for Zach to wear- even though he is a pastor’s kid (a double PK actually) he doesn’t often wear a jacket and tie. While we were shopping, I decided to look for a new tie for myself. But not just any old tie.

My dad was a lifelong Wake Forest fan. He graduated from Wake in 1965 and rarely missed a football or basketball game. That love of Wake Forest sports was definitely passed on to me, and I decided to look for a tie in old gold and black for his funeral. I looked in a number of stores but just couldn’t find the right tie. So decided to just wear one of my regular old ties.

The day of his funeral, Kelly and Zach and I were getting dressed at my parents house. And I just happened to look through my dad’s ties, where I found this one. It was EXACTLY the tie I had been looking for to wear. So I asked my mom if it was okay for me to wear it for the funeral. Of course she said yes. And that I should just keep it if I wanted it. It has become my favorite tie. I wear it on the most special and important of occasions; like Father’s Day.

As I was looking over the scriptures for today- I had really planned to focus on the OT or the Gospel lesson. I preached on 2 Corinthians two weeks ago and Worth used it last week, so it seemed like this week was a good chance to move on to something else. But as I read the verses from 2 Corinthians, and remembered that it was Father’s Day, I knew that I would HAVE to preach one more time on Paul’s second letter to the church in Corinth. It just fit too well to do anything else.

There are three phrases in those verses that have stuck in my mind all week: for we walk by faith, not by sight…For the love of Christ urges us on… and if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new! I think that each one is special enough to spend a little bit of time on this morning.

When Paul wrote to the Corinthians that we walk by faith and not by sight, he was doing so as a way of affirming their belief in Jesus, even though they had not ever seen Jesus during his earthly life. For that matter, neither did Paul. And that was a bit of an issue for Paul. In those first decades after Jesus was crucified and died, then was resurrected and ascended into heaven, there was some controversy about the legitimacy of those believers who never knew Jesus in his earthly life, especially about those who called themselves “apostles” yet never knew Jesus. Those who knew Jesus while he walked on the earth wondered if someone who didn’t actually know Jesus in the same way that they did could preach the “true gospel” of Jesus.

Yet Paul did preach the true Gospel of Jesus and he wanted to assure those who heard it from him that it was okay, that he was a legitimate apostle. Paul also wanted to tell them that even though they had never seen Jesus, even though they didn’t know him they way that those who were with him did, they too were still true followers of Jesus. Their faith was just as genuine as the sight of others.

It may not seem like that big of a deal to us today. We are all like those followers of Jesus who didn’t ever know him. We are thousands of years and thousands of miles removed. We know that we don’t have to have seen Jesus to know Jesus. We all walk by faith and not by sight. While we don’t need to hear Paul’s words in the same way the believers in Corinth did and we don’t need them to reinforce our legitimacy as Christians, we still need to hear them. Because even though we have no doubt about our legitimacy as believers, we still need to remember that we walk by faith and not by sight.

For us, walking by faith and not by sight is not so much about our faith in who Jesus was and who Jesus is, it is more about what Jesus is going to do. It is about how Jesus is at work in our lives. The faith that we walk by is a faith in God who creates, redeems, and sustains his children. It is a faith that trusts in our God enough to know that every little thing is going to be alright.

This journey that we are on that we call our lives often seems like we are stumbling around in the dark. We don’t know what we are doing and we can’t see where we are going. Even though we can’t know or see the future, we know that God will continue creating, Jesus will always be redeeming, and the Spirit will constantly sustain us, as we walk by faith and not by sight and follow our Lord and Savior.

For the love of Christ urges us on… it’s not always easy to be a follower of Jesus. It’s hard to walk by faith and not by sight. The Apostle Paul knew this and we know it too. Paul faced many challenges and difficulties even after he encountered the risen Christ- maybe even especially after he became a Christian. As I mentioned before, his legitimacy and authority as an apostle was questioned and constantly challenged. And he suffered from what he called “a thorn in his flesh” that kept him humble and made his life difficult. He was not that different from us.

We have challenges and difficulties in our lives as followers of Jesus. We struggle with being in the world but not of the world. We are challenged by the call to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. And we even struggle to love ourselves; especially to love ourselves in the same way that God loves us.

We are often incapable of looking at ourselves and seeing us the way that God sees us. We see our faults and failings; and God sees them too. But unlike they do to us, they don’t matter that much to God. For God loves us unconditionally, despite our faults and failings. God looks at us and sees all of those things that we see in ourselves that make us unlovable; unlovable by ourselves or anyone else, yet alone by the Creator of the heavens and earth and all that it is. God looks at us and sees our faults and failings and God loves us anyway.

God loves us so much that he died for us. When God became human, when Jesus died on the cross, it was all done for us and for our salvation, so that we might not die but may have everlasting life. This is the love of Christ that Paul writes about. It is the love to urges us on… it urges us on to love each other and to love the world in the same way that we are loved. It is the love that urges us on to love each other, despite being keenly aware of each others faults and failings. The love of Christ urges us on to love each other anyway.

It urges us on to live, and to love, not for ourselves, but for others. Which brings us to the last phrase from 2 Corinthians that has held my attention this week “So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!” This is the one that convinced me to preach one more week on this same letter. Because this is the one that reminded me so much of my dad.

For my brother and sister and I, we knew that we were loved unconditionally, supported and encouraged in all our endeavours. We were urged on by his love. My dad had a way about him that made it comfortable to be around him, even when there were no words to be said. When you were in his presence, you just knew that you were loved and accepted and valued and safe.

In addition to being a great father to me and my brother and sister, my dad was a “father” to many other boys, and later to many other men and women. He spent his life helping others to see themselves as the “new creation” in Christ that they are meant to be. Much of my dad’s career was spent as the director of the Winston-Salem Boys’ Club. It was those same gifts that he shared with us that enabled him to be a second father to countless boys who desperately needed a positive male influence in their lives. As he did with his own children, he loved them into seeing themselves as new creations in Christ.

After leaving the Boys’ Club, he went to work at Prodigals Community, which was a recovery community for people struggling to overcome addiction. At Prodigals, he helped many men and women to know that they were beloved children of God, that they were loved and forgiven- unconditionally and completely. It was at Prodigals where dad became the true representation of the Father as he greeted God’s beloved children and welcomed them home to the love that they desperately needed, greatly desired, and so deeply longed for.

My dad helped countless people to be able to see themselves as God sees them; he helped them to claim their identity as a child of God. No longer are they defined by their faults and failings, but they are “new creations” in Christ, everything old has passed away- all of the sins and shortcomings, all of the selfishness and striving to fit into the world, all of that is gone and we are made new.

I used the word “we” intentionally. For it is not just fatherless boys and substance addicted men and women who need to know that they are loved. It is not just them who need to see the old pass away and all things made new. This is something that we all need. We all need to claim our identity as new creations, as God’s beloved children.

I don’t want you to leave here thinking that my father was some kind of saint. He was a great man but he also had his own faults and failings. However, he didn’t allow those faults and failings to prevent him from seeing himself and others as God’s beloved children. On this Father’s Day, I know how very blessed that I am to have had a father who helped me to see and know this. But I also know that many aren’t as fortunate as I am. Many people struggle with Father’s Day. Either because their father’s are no longer with them (like me) or because their fathers have never been with them or, even worse, they had fathers who were the exact opposite of what a father is supposed to be.

Yet I also know that God gives us a father. Maybe not in the men who caused us to be born or who were married to our mothers, but God gives us at least one man in our life who fills that role of father, who helps us to walk by faith and not by sight, who urges us on with the love of Christ, who helps us to see ourselves as new creations in Christ.

So on this Father’s Day, just like I wear this tie to honor and remember my father and to give thanks to God for giving him to me, I want us all to take a moment to honor and remember our fathers, and give thanks to God for sharing them with us. Whether it is our actual father or another who was or is like a father to us; they are indeed a gift of God.

And even as we give thanks, let us also be challenged to be like them; to do for others as they have done for us. For we all need those people in our lives who see us as God sees us and who help us to become who God has created us to be. And we are all called to be those people to each other and to the world. It doesn’t take being a father or a mother, but it does take the being able to love like a father or a mother, it takes being able to love each other as we are loved by God- who creates us, redeems us and sustains us. It takes someone who knows that they are a new creation in Christ and wants to help others know that they too are new creations in Christ. So let us urge each other on with the love of Christ as we walk by faith in that love.

 

Amen

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